Tag: Texas

Headshot of Debbie Dooley

Debbie Dooley on the Conservative Case for Clean Energy

Georgia’s Debbie Dooley is a founding member of the Tea Party movement, as well as an advocate for renewable energy and president of Conservatives for Energy Freedom. In an interview with CEFF, Dooley discussed where alternative energy can fit into a conservative political philosophy, how to build bipartisan support for clean energy, and her vision for state and federal policy.

ICP Responds to Need for Energy Efficiency Standardization

The United States energy efficiency industry will have to standardize projects before it can receive large-scale private financing, according to our recent Q&A with a senior manager at Citigroup. Meanwhile, commercial building owners are skeptical that energy efficiency retrofits will be financially worthwhile.

Could Behavior Change Insights Drive Demand for Energy Efficiency?

Proven strategies for encouraging customers to use new technologies and seek financing are critical to the diffusion of energy efficiency solutions. Even with financing, energy efficiency programs face significant hurdles in driving customer demand, particularly in the small- and medium-scale markets. The recent Behavior, Energy & Climate Conference (BECC) 2014 offered insights on customer motivation.

What’s Unique about the Texas PACE-in-a-Box Toolkit

Texas faces an unusual scenario when it seeks to advance property-assessed clean energy (PACE). The state has a tradition of seeking private-sector solutions and streamlining government activities. This means PACE methods adopted in other states – such as Connecticut – would not work in Texas. Also, Texas’s private sector is massive. The state’s businesses – and their environmental footprint – are growing rapidly. In a Nov. 18 webinar called “PACE in Texas 101,” Charlene Heydinger, executive director of Keeping PACE in Texas, said Texas uses 19 percent of the industrial energy consumed in the United States.

The Struggle to Combine Energy Efficiency and Solar Power

How can programs motivate homeowners to make their homes energy-efficient before installing solar panels? And how can incentives support a whole-house retrofit approach that will optimize energy savings and prevent solar systems from being oversized? California, Wisconsin, New Jersey, and Austin Energy have been grappling with this challenge for years. Their experiences show well-designed incentives may drive the joint adoption of solar power and energy efficiency. Simply introducing energy efficiency requirements into the solar installation process may not be successful without adding financial motivation.