Tag: policy

Cory Connolly

Cory Connolly

Policy Memo: Saving Money in Michigan With Residential PACE Financing

Michigan can unlock energy-saving upgrades for homeowners by passing residential property assessed clean energy legislation. The legislation should guarantee energy savings and protect consumers by including a method for determining eligible energy-saving measures; restrictions to R-PACE financing amounts and underwriting criteria; and robust consumer protection provisions.
Joe Indvik

Joe Indvik

Policy Memo: Establishing a National Energy Benchmarking Standard for Commercial Buildings

To capture the energy efficiency opportunity across the U.S. economy, the House Energy and Commerce Committee should introduce a bill to establish a national energy benchmarking standard for commercial buildings. Building on the success of local ordinances, the proposed bill would create a national requirement while giving state and local governments the option to maintain more aggressive requirements if they desire.
Solar carport at Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico

A solar carport at Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, built by Native American owned and operated developer Diversified Systems Manufacturing / U.S. Department of State / CC BY-NC 2.0

What Is Holding Back Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country?

An energy paradox lingers in Indian Country, the land base of Native Americans in the contiguous 48 states: enormous renewable energy generation potential, but numerous barriers to development and electrification. This article is the first in a two-part series on barriers and opportunities for renewable energy in Indian Country.
Chris Nelson headshot

Chris Nelson

Can Solar Catch Up to Wind in South Dakota?

South Dakota is a national leader in the proportion of its electricity mix coming from wind energy. CEFF spoke to South Dakota Public Utilities Commission Vice Chairman Chris Nelson about the status of clean energy in the state. He contends that the rise of wind in the state is traceable to federal incentives and a business-friendly policy landscape, and argues that solar may be better positioned for future growth.
Austin skyline

Austin, TX / Jonathan Cutrer / CC BY 2.0

Renewables Industry Gears Up for ITC/PTC Step-Downs at GTM Conference

On October 29-30, renewable energy industry stakeholders gathered in Austin, Texas for Greentech Media’s 2019 Power and Renewables Summit. At the start of the conference, audience members were asked to identify the biggest challenge facing renewable energy development over the next five years. The most popular answer — besides an economic slowdown — was the impending step-down in renewable energy tax credits.
Photo of Dylan Voorhees

Dylan Voorhees / Photo courtesy of Natural Resources Council of Maine

Maine Prepares for Policy Shift Toward Clean Energy

Maine’s renewable energy landscape is poised for big changes. Legislation passed into law in June establishes greenhouse gas emission reduction targets and an ambitious renewable portfolio standard. In this interview, Dylan Voorhees, climate and clean energy director of the Natural Resources Council of Maine, explains what the new laws mean for the state, and what brought about the shift in policy.
David Campell

Photo courtesy of David Campbell.

Cost-Competitive Renewables Poised to Grow in Deregulated Texas Market

Texas offers an instructive case study for the growth of renewable energy. Most of the state’s electricity is delivered through the deregulated Electric Reliability Council of Texas market. The state has long since surpassed its mandated renewable portfolio standard, so market dynamics dictate the ongoing pace of renewables growth. Nonetheless, Texas is by far the country’s largest wind power generator and is slated to see major growth in solar capacity as well.
Solar panels in Ohio

Rooftop solar at Ohio's Wayne National Forest / Wayne National Forest / CC BY 2.0

What’s Next for Renewable Energy in Ohio?

In July, the state of Ohio passed its HB 6 energy bill, which authorizes $300 million in annual surcharges on utility ratepayers, primarily to fund four struggling coal and nuclear power plants. The bill also scales back the state’s clean energy targets. Now that HB 6 has been signed into law, what changes will it bring for stakeholders in the industry?